Buildcorp: Sydney Law Courts PVC Vinyl banners

  • Date 20 May 2021
  • Reading time 2 mins read

This was an absolutely fantastic project to be part of! It was challenging and stimulating on so many levels to work on PVC Vinyl banners for Buildcorp, and working with Buildcorp is a wonderfully seamless and smooth experience. We’re proud to have been chosen to work alongside them on this project, and look forward to many future collaborations with them! We also had the privilege of designing the hoarding with Lucy Simpson’s beautiful Ngaarr print, which adds something truly special to the project.

Refurbishing the Law Courts in Sydney is a project awash with tricky installs, council permits and flexible timelines, but Buildcorp look set to guarantee stunning results in no time. We’re glad to have been part of the process!

The Challenge
We knew from the start that this project would take a few months. From the central location to the need for so many council permits, and the highly tricky install, slow and steady would win the race here!

PVC Vinyl banners
Our fantastic team found the perfect solution. The banners were installed in three separate sections, months apart. We started with Macquarie Street in June 2020, then moved onto Queen’s Parade before finishing on Phillip Street in December 2020.

The Product
We opted for PVC Vinyl banners with keder edging, a highly durable substrate that’s perfect for areas of intense pedestrian and vehicle traffic. The keder edging is also ideal for urban sites, as it provides extra protection against graffiti and vandalism, and the inclusion of a sailtrack reduces wind pressure on the structure. This means the banners, and the structure, will stay up through thick and thin.

PVC Vinyl banners
The Result
It was worth the wait! The PVC Vinyl banners look fantastic and create a huge impact in this highly trafficked zone. The client is delighted, and our team is rightly proud of what they have achieved.


About Ngaarr
hard / strong.
This is a story of presence and strength. Derived from the patterning of the inner bark of a gulabaa (eucalypt tree), these designs by Yuwaalaraay artist Lucy Simpson, highlight the conversation about care of country. They speak of contemporary Aboriginal experience and presence, and highlight the importance of First Nations placemaking in the built environment.

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